roomonfiredesign:

'Double Negative Pyramid', Europos Parkas Open Air Museum, Lithuania, 1999 by American artist Solomon “Sol” LeWitt (September 9, 1928 – April 8, 2007). LeWitt was linked to various movements, including Conceptual art and Minimalism and rose to fame in the late 1960s with his wall drawings and “structures” (a term he preferred instead of “sculptures”), but was prolific in a wide range of media including drawing, printmaking, photography, and painting. He has been the subject of hundreds of solo exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world since 1965.

roomonfiredesign:

'Double Negative Pyramid', Europos Parkas Open Air Museum, Lithuania, 1999 by American artist Solomon “Sol” LeWitt (September 9, 1928 – April 8, 2007). LeWitt was linked to various movements, including Conceptual art and Minimalism and rose to fame in the late 1960s with his wall drawings and “structures” (a term he preferred instead of “sculptures”), but was prolific in a wide range of media including drawing, printmaking, photography, and painting. He has been the subject of hundreds of solo exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world since 1965.

rudygodinez:

Agustín Hernández Navarro, Hernández House, Mexico City, (1973)

Unlike “critical realism” based in vernacular traditions (arquitectura popular), Navarro’s “emotional architecture” (his term) draws from symbols of famous Pre-Columbian archaeological sites and monumental structures of historical significance.  Formally abstracted and articulated in industrial/contemporary materials, his buildings are not abstract Modernism of the International, placeless order: the elements of Navarro’s architecture remain recognizable, communicative, literal (although, as in the case of any abstraction, sometimes to intended, and sometimes unintended, effects).